A sequence not found in the OEIS: part 6

7, 9, 11, 13, 17, 19, 21, 25, 29, 35, 37, 41, 49, 53,
57, 61, 65, 67, 77, 85, 89, 97, 101, 109, 121, 125,
131, 137, 145, 149, 161, 165, 169, 181, 197, 205,
209, 217, 221, 229, 245, 253, 257, 259, 265, 277,
281, 301, 305, 317, 329, 337, 341, 349, 361, 365,
385, 389, 397, 401, 425, 449, 457, 461, 469, 481,
485, 489, 505, 515, 517, 529, 541, 545, 557, 565,
569, 581, 589, 617, 625, 629, 637, 665, 677, 689

Examples: a(1) = 7 = 3 + 2 * 21. a(60) = 401 = 3 + 2 * 1991.
a(80) = 617 = 3 + 2 * 3071….

PS

m can be equal to n.

PPS

199 and 307 are prime(46) and prime(63), respectively.

PPPS

Computation was performed by using Perl and Ruby, and I
welcome more terms.

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One thought on “A sequence not found in the OEIS: part 6

  1. Dear Mr. Mizuki,
    I assume your sequence is a double sequence, in other words, with two independent integer indices n,m, the general term of which I denote here (with two parentheses added) by a_{n,m}=3+2*(prime(m))^n. It is ordered according to increasing values of a_{n,m}.
    For clarification purposes, could you confirm my assumption?
    I am not a specialist in computer algorithms but it seems to me that the main problem is how to generate prime(m) and scan efficiently prime(m) and n, isn't it? I would like trying to perform the computation in PARI/GP, if I can.
    In this case I see you are proposing a new sequence.
    As you know this is my first comment to your interesting blog, mainly dedicated to Biology and Computer Science, integer sequences in particular.
    Best regards
    Américo Tavares

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